Here's your chance to brag on the Father of Role-Playing Games. Tell us how he changed your life, his effect on math, learning and social skills. The more you post the louder our voice is in getting this great man the honor he deserves!

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Carl Brown ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

I'm not really sure how to start this. I guess I can start out by talking about how
Gary Gygax first inspired me during the turbulent period of my teenage years,
how he provided direction and inspiration to many young boys and girls when
they needed it most. I guess I could say something about how he stoked and
fueled the fires of imagination in millions of people around the world, how he
dared people to dream, and because of this, allowed them to aspire to greater
heights in their lives and to make those "dreams" a reality. The truth is, no
matter what I could say about Gary, the words would not due him the justice he
deserves. So few people make the kind of impact on others that Gary did, and
for his impact on me, I can only say thank you. I still read his works daily, and still
play several of his games on a regular basis. I feel a terrible sense of loss at the
fact that Gary is no longer here to guide us down the path he pointed out to all
of so long ago, but I know it's because he is busy forging ahead on yet another,
different path, that one day we will follow him on again.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Rob Reid ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

I grew up in New Zealand, and I was always a geeky kid, building things and
designing games. By the time Gary Gygax released D&D in the early 1970s I
was a table top war gamer, as Gary himself had been. One day some of the
younger kids started bringing fantasy figures in and running battles on a hex
board. I remember the first moment I saw this new activity in the club. One player
was advising another party member to hit an intimidating looking black caped elf
with as many arrows as possible before he closed. The elf’s player whined “Not
fair!”. I was in my early teens, and I remember some older war gamers looking
disparagingly upon this new development, but I thought it was fascinating, seeing
those strange mythical creatures and wondering at their exotic powers. Even
the hex board stirred my imagination. The club split and I stayed with the war
gamers. Years later I put it together that I had seen D&D arrive.
It wasn’t until finishing university in 1984 that I got into D&D. My girlfriend
introduced me to a friend of hers who had been playing for a couple of years,
and he loaned me a very well thumbed Players Handbook. I was immediately
hooked. I joined the group without the slightest idea that it was a good idea to set
watches at night, and found myself playing the Sergeant leading a patrol for the
army of Gran March. I learned so much about people. I learned the game from
that group, played with them for about 15 years and joined another group when I
changed city, but my original group is still together. Now I have spawned my own
group – 5 young rookies who can’t wait for the weekly session. In this way Gary’s
game brings us together, and lets us learn from each other. Players and DMs
have a lineage – Big Al got me started as a DM, and in the fullness of time I shall
help one of my rookies to take over, I hope – I wan

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

John Beelendorf ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

I remember still that first day that I opened that small little red box that
contained the original dungeons and dragons game. From that small little box
to my "Gaming" library from which I have had countless hours of fun and delight
as a youth to that of a father teaching his children the same game he learned as
a child. For this treasure I will also hold Gary Gygax as a esteemed mentor and
educator for his games have helped me with reading and mathmatics as it does
now with my own children. You will be forever in my prayers Gary Gygax.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

John Reyst ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
http://www.d20pfsrd.com

Put simply enough, Gary is ultimately responsible for thousands and thousands
of hours of the fun in my life. I can't thank him enough for the good things that
have resulted in my life due to Dungeons and Dragons, including most of my life
long friends. I wish I had thanked him while he was still on the prime material
plane.

Anyway, thanks Gary, I truly appreciate the gifts you have given the world.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Chuck Gilmour ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
http://tinyurl.com/facebook-chuckgilmour

No one man has ever effected the course of my life like Gary has. I was 9 in
1980 and played in my first game. He inspired works of art, short stories, books,
and even a college report for me over the last 30 years. Much of pop culture
today can be traced back to his works and is completely taken for granted. He
helped me come to terms and even be proud with being a geek! I never met the
man in person, but as with countless others, I felt the loss of a close friend when
he left us to start the ultimate adventure. He is loved and missed.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Jim ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

It's because of Gary that I have had an everlasting hobby. He was very nice
to answer an email that I had sent to him years ago with concerns about the
game we so love and cherish. He seemed to be a warm soul and he continues
to inspire me with all his written works. I was probably only 10 years old when I
discovered the old AD&D books and I am 39 now. I am using the old books as
a basis for a new fantasy world inspired by the old style. Gary's approach to life
and having fun will always be a beacon of light in my life.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Robert Brannon ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Gary helped my imagination come alive from 1980 on. Thanks to him I gained a
renewed interest in history and literature. Thank you Mr. Gygax, wherever you
are I'm sure adventure is with you.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Ross (or "Marakell Blackhand") ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

I got in to Dungeons & Dragons in middle school. It was 2000, so right between
the switch from AD&D2nd to 3.0. A friend of mine knew how much I loved
roleplaying games on computers (specifically Baldur's Gate) and consoles and
told me about this incredible game where you can do everything you could dream
of and even make your own weapons. I asked him where such a game could be
purchased. He handed me the AD&D1 monster manual (The pegasus and red
dragon cover) and said "Keep it". I read the book secretly during class, having
no idea what the stat blocks meant, but found them extremely entertaining.
That day I told my friend I'd be interested in the game. Shortly after, we made a
character during lunch. He did a fairly simply roleplaying run with me the next day
with a few combat moments. I was hooked. After a few weeks of hoarding my
lunch money, I purchased the 3.0 Players Guide and DMG. A week after that, I
purchased the MM. To this day I joke that "The only reason I have for a job is for
my supplements". Gygax, you were a great man who did a great many things.
Your creation has provided me with many many hours of fun and excellent
adventures. I have recruited many new players along the way. I will never forget
the magic of my first game when I first cast a die to fight an orc at that lunch table
ten years ago. I look forward to the day I have children with my fiance (also a
gamer) so I might pass the tradition on to them.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Paul Leicht ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

My gaming life and interest in the fantasy RPG genre began with the discovery
of the magenta D&D Basic Starter Set in 1981 when I was 11 years old. After
several years of playing different versions of D&D, I had the pleasure of meeting
Gary twice; once at a book signing for one of his novels at a Walden Books,
and more recently at a GenCon some years ago. On each occasion he struck
me as a very down to earth, warm, and encouraging person. His life's work and
words of encouragement continue to inspire me creatively, contributing to my
fierce interest in reading and writing. Today I re-read his modules and novels for
fun and I am constantly reminded of his positive spirit. Sadly I do not get to play
D&D anymore due to preoccupations with work and family, but I hope to play
again with my kids when they are older so they can experience the game and
the journey for themselves. Thank you Gary for creating worlds that were, and
remain, so much fun to play in. Thank you, Good Sir!

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Tim Crowley ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Gary didn't just affect my life like any ordinary gamer. He brought my life anew.
I was a mere 9 years old when I started playing D&D. It was all because my
mother purchased a "book" that I would be intrested in. That book was a player's
handbook for 2nd edition D&D. I got so into this book that I started to get my
friends into it. I soon started my first D&D session was with 3 friends of mine who
are still with me today. Because of that fated meeting with my orginal "party", I
still hold those friends close to me to this day. Soon my life changed like I never
would have expected it. I went into High School knowing no one but my close
friend. But thanks to Dungeons and Dragons, I met people who were intrested
in the same thing. And they became my friends quite quickly. Over time my
friendship circle grew and grew and I have so many people close to me that I
don't have time to see them all in a month. But most of all, I have to be thankfull
for the Wonderfull woman I met through gaming. I cannot express my gratitude
and heart felt appreciation enough to Gary for (unknowingly) having me meet
my soon to be wife. Thank you Gary Gygax. Thank you for the game you have
created but most of all, thank you for the great person you've created within me.
You've shaped my life for the best. I will love and miss you gary.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Don ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

I never really liked reading until I purchased my first basic Dungeons and
Dragons books at a yard sale when I was 11 or 12. I fell in love with the art work
then I read the first few pages. I was hooked after that! Every time we traveled
to our nearest mall I stopped into the hobby shop to see the books. A little later I
began reading the novels that were coming out. The reading and research I did
while involved with a Dungeons and Dragons Character improved my grades,
kept me out of trouble, and improved my school work. I would have liked to have
me Mr. Gygax to thank him for such an entertaining game.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Stephen Ross ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Gary codified and championed a social format that brought people together
to play an adult version of "Let's Pretend". People opened up and shared
their imagination and aspirations, their fears and desires. While the game and
camaraderie at the time were great fun, the friendships from those shared stories
and events have lasted years after the game. All our lives have been made richer
and fuller because of his work.

For many he inspired them to become world builders and storytellers, to craft
things anew in their own format and to share them with others. This entailed a
lot of work besides the creative spark. People learned amazing things that they
would have never sought out otherwise. It has increased our appreciation and
understanding of cultural diversity and history more than anything in the last 50
years.

Did I mention he helped to spawn an entertainment business that he saw through
troubled times until it went “corporate” and became part of “big business”? The
business he shepherded put Lake Geneva on the map.

It would only make sense that there should be a memorial. And if only we could
fill the bronze with our thanks, or dice and a map to elysium…

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Nick Schroeder ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

I remember picking up a used Dungeons and Dragons starter game as a 10 year
old. I don't play D&D anymore, but I have played Magic:The Gathering for over
15 years and Magic would not have been possible without Gary's games and
literature opening up the creative minds of people like Richard Garfield. As a
resident of Indianapolis and a regular GenCon attendee since it came to our city,
we are proud to call Indy the home of GenCon. Thank you Gary. You will never
be fogotten.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Rick Stevens ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

I turned 14 in 1978 and since then, the works of E. Gary Gygax have brought me
thousands of hours of joy, relaxation and good camaraderie with friends made
around the world.

His work made me think. I had to learn strategy, and new ways to approach
problems. These are things I took away from the gaming table and made work in
the real world.

I will miss Gary's input into the gaming world and both the real world and the
myriad gaming universes he helped bring into existance will be poorer places
without him.

Farewell and thanks again, Gary.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Iosephus ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

So much of my childhood was defined by staying up late and reading or playing
the works of Mr. Gygax. Even today, when I see the products of the OSR/
retroclone movement, I get very excited and nostalgic.

It took awhile to put together, but my own retroclone OD&D game will be starting
in this Autumn.

Thanks, buddy, for all you did.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Paul Stinson ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Gary made geeks become friends with each other and make them feel
worthwhile - it's not all about getting picked first for the football team any more.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Renn S. Breshears ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Mr. Gygax was the influence on so many parts of my life it is hard to express
them. I owe him my sense of honor, my ethics, my career, and most importantly
the idea that I am a hero. Designing dungeons and castles to game in as a child
is probably why I am an architect today. If you need help with ideas or designs
for his memorial I would be honorbound to assist. R.I.P.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Michael E. Fitzpatrick ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Roleplaying games have formed the bedrock of my social life for the past 20
years, and Mr. Gygax helped lay the foundation of that hobby. Through his work I
have made life-long friends; men and women whom have enriched my life. None
of that would have been possible without the contribution of Mr. Gygax and his
contempories to a pasttime with it's roots deeply embedded in the innate human
desire to tell our friends stories.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Scott C. Nolan ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Gary Gygax should be remembered as a man who improved the lives of millions
of people worldwide. He gave those millions a lasting legacy of community,
education and most of all, fun. As Americans, we revere hard work and tend
to give play short shrift. But perhaps we should collectively remember Gary
in the same way we do Walt Disney or Charlie Chaplin or Johnny Carson: as
someone who enriched our lives by taking an existing form of entertainment and
completely and forever leaving that entertainment changed for the better.

I first began to play Dungeons and Dragons in 1977 and over the last thirty-three
years it has given me countless hours of pleasure and intellectual stimulation, as
well as the opportunity to meet some of the best people in my life. I met Gary at
GenCon in 1980 when I was sixteen years old. Even amidst a sea of gamers, all
of whom wanted some of his attention, he was kind and generous with his time.

But Gary's greatest gift to millions of people around the world was an awakening
of imagination. Over the decades, I have personally watched his game develop
the creativity of many dozens of young people. I watched their grasp of history,
mythology, literature and religion grow as a result of the game, watched their
vocabularies and even their spelling improve remarkably.

Gary deserves a memorial in stone as a testament to the much greater memorial
he built of paper, people and imagination. Finally, Lake Geneva should be proud
to call him its Favorite Son. No one else has done as much to bring the attention
of the world to your fair town. Millions of gamers owe Gary Gygax a debt of
gratitude; Lake Geneva owes him an eternal place in its park.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Kevin Morton ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

That Gary created an extremely popular game cannot be disputed. What is
often overlooked is the positive nature of that game. D&D allowed the creative
introvert an outlet for their dreams. It brought together literally millions of people
who might otherwise never had any reason for meeting. Countless friendships
developed as a result. I think the basic judge of a man's life is whether someone
left the world a better a place through their works. Gary Gygax certainly did so.
Thank you Gary for enriching my life in a myriad of ways.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Charlene Andersen
http://facebook.com/Tarot.Panacea

Without Gary Gygax & Dave Arneson, I would not be the person I am today —
and I think I'm a better person for that influence. Playing Advanced Dungeons
& Dragons at 15 was an important step for me in learning about cameraderie,
small group dynamics, communication, imagination, story-telling and analytical
thinking. I look forward to seeing a tangible memorial to Mr. Gygax erected in his
hometown.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Michael Huggett ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

I'm 40 now, I shouldn't be, I should be dead. Some childhoods should not
happen, mine shouldn't have, but it did. I was at the end of my ability to cope,
when I picked up two things; the Dragonlance series and the 2nd edition DnD.
Playing a knight was the turning the point for me, reading the adventures of the
companions in the Dragaonlance series saved me (It is my view that all fantasy
was affected by Gary, in a similar vein as fantasy was so affected by Tolkien,
Lewis and other notables). The ability to escape through imagination was what
helped me to continue striving for something better, when it seemed so much
easier to just qive up. I never met Gary, I wish I had; but through his work I met
him, and grew to know him. He was there in every dungeon, in the pub, on the
lone roads between adventures. He is missed, and will continue to be be missed.
I, for one, miss those early days of DnD, when the ideas of such a game where in
their infancy, the wonder of rpg game play still being discovered and the approval
that it is ok to exploer imagination, young and old alike. It is our our ability to
imagine that allows us to rise above the reality of our life. Gary new this, and for
that, I am thankful.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

D.A. Wells ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

I've never played a game that Mr. Gygax designed or wrote. But every game
I've played was, in part, inspired by his seminal works. I never met the man, but
gather with my friends to toast his memory yearly.

He was influential in game design and the popularization of fantasy literature
generally. He opened the imaginations of millions of people, young and old, men
and women, in Wisconsin, in America, and across the world.

Lake Geneva should be as proud to call him a son, if not moreso, than other
celebrities and public figures. I encourage the council to approve the lakeside
memorial.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Brandon Kohn ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

I remember the first time I picked up a Monster Manual sometime back in 1981.
It was at a B. Dalton's bookstore in Augusta, GA. I was 10 years old. I remember
the fascination I felt looking through the pages. The exotic descriptions and
mysterious codes detailing the creatures were enthralling. It literally awoke a
passion in me for imagination and a love of knowledge. Something I know refer
to as the texture of life. Gary's works taught very valuable lessons about effort
and reward. After beginning with the Basic D&D set, I quickly worked my way
through learning rules until as a teenager I was an avid AD&D gamer. I'll never
forget the fun times and comrades I enjoyed while playing. I believe that the
coupling of book and game instilled me with an appreciation for learning which
eventually led me through graduate degrees in physics and computer science.
Thank you for the life lessons Gary. I owe you so much.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Ryan Tuck ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

I am currently 16 years old and I think I started playing dnd when I was 8. I have
loved every minute of it. I think I started playing 3.0 but most of my time playing
was during the 3.5 era. I have met so many awesome people when I was playing
this amazing game. I have met them at small local conventions and at big ones
like Gencon which I have proudly been to every one since 2000. Gary is and
always will be one of my hero's I had a chance to meet him personally due to one
of my dad's friends and he just has an amazing perosnality. He will always be the
king of all games for he was the one to create RPG's as we know it you will be
missed DM prime.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

John Cochrane ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Playing AD&D brought our group of high school and college friends together
more than any other activity could match. We spent thousands of hours
entertaining each other, gaining a pleasure from gaming stronger than the allure
of legal or illegal drugs could promise. The game improved our interpersonal
communications skills, and honed our problem-solving skills. Mr Gygax created
a fertile multiverse which continues to expand as long as gamers use their
imaginations. Thank you, DM Prime, for your enduring gift.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Franck VIDAL ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
http://destaxispourlesgalaxies.blogspot.com/

In my life there is a before D&D and an after D&D... Gary GYGAX changed my
life.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Matt Ward ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Dungeons and Dragons got me into reading. It made reading amongst my friends
and I something that was cool. It also exposed us to all sorts of mythological
legends and worldly religions. Without DnD I would have never learned as much
as I did as a young man.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Shiloh Liedtke ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Gary Gygax is a hero to all gamers worldwide. He taught us that anything we
could imagine was worthwhile and worth adventuring through.

Thank you, Gary, for everything.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Hans-Peter Weiss

Gary Gygax was the stone that made a landslide. And it got me 1984.
Thx for it from Austria.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Len Henderson ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Been playing for more than 20 years now, and it's my primary hobby. Thanks
Gary.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

R Thomas ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Gary Gygax probably had more impact on gaming than anyone in history -
except possibly the guy that invented the ball.
He changed the gaming world. All the new games we play today in some way are
derived from D&D.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Sean Holland ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
http://seaofstarsrpg.wordpress.com/

I have been playing D&D for over 30 years and RPGs are my primary hobby. It is
a great way to expand you mind and have fun with your friends.

I had the good fortune to meet Gary back in the 80s and he was very kind to
a young gamer. Thank you Gary, your contribution to geek culture will not be
forgotten.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Grant Howitt ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
http://www.zombielarp.co.uk

D&D has changed my life - my best friend (and best man at my wedding) and I
met when he invited me to be the cleric in his 3.5 newbies game. Since then, I've
been in and run more games than I can remember.

Thank you, Mr Gygax, for making the prospect of telling daft stories about killing
orcs and defeating evil wizards a reality.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Anonymous Gamer ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

D&D truly changed me. It introduced me to the Internet, to fantasy, to FFRP, and
to writing. Without D&D, I wouldn't be who I was. I'd be another average Joe.
Gygax's timeless work made me understand what I was meant to be. I started
playing at nine, and the day I stop playing will be the day my heart stops beating.
May Gygax rest in peace.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

David Insley ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

I began playing Dungeons and Dragons in 1982 at the age of 11. It became my
favorite hobby and, at 39, I still play, along with my two sons, ages 11 and 7. It's
a great way to spend time doing something fun with friends and family and ahh,
the war stories I could tell you.
The game Gary and his cohorts pioneered in the 1970s has activated the
imaginations and stirred the souls of millions. As young as 13, I could see how
the basic-math and human-interaction skills required to play the game had a
practical application in school. Kids who were bad students, poor at math, and
lacked social skills, were shy, or even downright unfriendly, changed into wholly
different, more mature and downright smarter people after sitting at a D&D table
and sharing an experience in the game with others like him.
It's not just about rolling dice and killing orcs; it's about community, friends, and
fun.
God Bless Gary for his work, and may true RPGs never grow old and tired. I am
greatly appreciative of his brainchild, and wish others could enjoy it for the true
happiness and laughs it has brought into my life, and those of my friends, fellow
gamers, and kids.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Zak Withrow ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Ever since elementary school I can think back to weekends spent at my friend's
houses playing D&D for hours. I'm in college now and my friends and I still play
together. Thanks to Gary we can create our own worlds, bring our imaginations
to life. Our game nights are more than just a gathering of friends. It's where we
shrug off all the problems and stress of our daily lives and go to the world we
creates.

I want to thank Gary for everything he's done, and I plan on passing everything
he's done down to my children.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Mr Vincent ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Gary Gygax is to gaming as Albert Einstein is to science. There is no equal,
there is no other. No successor could possibly have such a profound effect on
society as Gary and his games. Growing up, I remember playing AD&D during
lunch, between classes, and after middle school in the hallway. for more than ten
minutes at a time, our game master had us spell bound on a hard linoleum floor
-- quite a feat for 7th graders. I recall many sleepless weekend nights breaking
into dawn the next day as time took a back seat to the stories that unfolded by
our GM. Certainly Gary's games has had a profound effect on many Americans.
Growing up and playing his games, I learned more about social interaction, math,
language, and acting than I ever could have in school. Despite the initial negative
stigma Dungeons and Dragons received, we still played. We formed life long
lasting friendships between players. I can't express in words how deeply grateful
I am for Gary's creativity and ingenuity to bring Dungeons and Dragons to life.
I am grateful today to discover the memorial and I look forward to someday
visiting it with a close knit group of friends to sit and reflect upon the man who
became a legend in his own time...but also to game on! Sadly there are younger
generations who will never know who Gary was or what a tremendous impact he
had on society. From films and books to social networking (before the term was
even coined), Gary's legacy is tremendous. Gary will be missed by many, and I
can only hope that while he is gone he will not be forgotten.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Marc Otten ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
http://www.neverwinterconnections.com

I had accomplish the hard tests of G.E.D easy after having no in class schooling
since 3rd grade and little home schooling. RPG Pen and Paper games kept my
brother and I interactive with math, reading and more to continue the tales of
our childhood heroes. Thank you Gary for having a fun part with that and my
education.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

David Gannon ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

I was 16, and had burned my hand severely. While waiting for the doctor to
return with the bandages, I pondered if my burns were damage, or disability in
D&D terms. Just then, the doctor came back in and I asked if he had ever played
D&D. Surprised, he said that he was still playing and invited me into his gaming
group. From that, my current circle of friends has formed. Without that question
of D&D, I would not have the job I now have (gaming friend put my resume in
with a good word), I would not be living where I am (another gaming friend is my
landlord), and my entire life would be different. Out of roughly 30 close friends,
only 2 cannot be directly linked to that question in the doctor's office. He and I are
still friends, and we both still play D&D. Thank you, Gary.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Eric Reiter ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

I discovered gaming as a young boy of about 10 years old. It was during the 80's
when a bunch of frightened people thought it was an evil thing to do. We were
playing it at a Civil War Reenactment that our parents did and they banned us
from playing D&D...they didn't see the irony. We just went on playing it but we left
the books and dice at home and just used our imaginations.

Thank you, Gary, for teaching me how to flex my imagination muscles.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

superfly2000
http://www.nwngenesis.com

I guess many others work stem from the work of Gary Gygax and his team when
it comes to roleplaying. We had a swedish version of that you can say. Although
I was not super much into pen and paper gaming we did do it a couple of times
in my younger years. After that it has been mostly games like Baldur's Gate and
of course the computer game I have been playing the last 10 years, Neverwinter
Nights.
In all of theese games the work of Gary Gygax is featured...so what can I
say...thanks for bringing the game!

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

ffbj ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Coming to D&D with a preset group of gamers in 1977 was sort of a dream come
true. A bunch of guys living together, sort of a frat house of gaming. I think there
were eventually 4 campaigns going at one time or another. So we have GG to
thank for that, along with his co-creator Dave Arneson, who I gamed with a few
times.

It, D&D, literally opened up new worlds for me and has been my main hobby for
over 30 years. Thanks Gary.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

John "Killer Dungeon Master" ZK ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
http://www.killerdungeon.com

Gygax is a name that I find synonymous with imagination, creativity and fun. His
part in the creation of D&D has never been forgotten at any of my gaming tables
in the last 34+ years. And his creation of game modules like The Tomb of Horrors
has inspired me to always challenge my players, be fair in my DMing and keep
the game heroic and deadly.

His lifelong role as a Dungeon Master was never in vain and although I never
had the pleasure of shaking his hand, I hope in the next world I do get an
opportunity to sit at his table and enjoy rolling some dice, drinking some
Guinness and generally having a good time with him.

He rolled a natural 20 in this world!

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Jon aka RoAnnon ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Gary Gygax opened up a universe of imagination wherein anyone could exercise
their creativity to the limits of their own will. It is an unlimited universe still being
plumbed today.
Thank you Gary for sharing your vision with the world and opening the door
through which anyone can share theirs, as well.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Michael Philip Williams ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
http://warlockswatch.blogspot.com/

Gary Gygax was not only a father figure to me during my childhood, but he was
an inspiration to me to believe in dreams coming true. Granted I never had the
honor of meeting the man. But he inspired me by never giving up on gamers.
When I was getting bulled in school, dnd was there to help me cope. I cant count
how many times since high school I have been asked if I still play and to this day
I still smile and say “yes I do” with pride. Its not common outside of gaming to
find so many dedicated and devoted people to a hobby that you do with Rpg's
especially dnd .
Because of gary I find myself taking all my years of gaming and I am starting to
build games myself. Every project I take up I tell myself the same thing. I can
reach just one person with my game the same way gary touched and reached
me then I was successful in my efforts.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

William Batten ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Gary's contribution to my life are probably uncountable. His creation led me to understand myself better and has given me a valuable tool to help my students understand themselves better as well!

I would definitely make a pilgrimage to give thanks to the man and the town that have given me so much enjoyment.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Dave Crowell aka Eat2surf ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )
http://www.neverwinternights.com

I first picked up the "three booklets" that were D&D in 1977.

I was just 12 years old and didn't know that I had just purchased a key that helped me unlock my imagination.

But, it's more than that. Gary's creation helped me realize that: research is good and useful, cooperation works wonders, friends are forever, friends don't have to agree to be friends, it's all good, Dr Pepper is wonderful but to be enjoyed in moderation, moderation is ok, nothing is so bad it can't be dealt with,  whatever happens a laugh makes it better, laughing with others is better than laughing alone, and it's ok to be smart and imaginative.

Many of those that knowingly or unknowingly owe gratitude to E. Gary Gygax may not find this site in time to be heard. I assure you, the responses here are just a tiny tip of the iceberg.

I would love journey to his monument and hold a quick gaming session to be able to show my respect.

Thank you for the opportunity to share these thoughts,

Dave

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

Timothy Piazzi ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

I was 13 entering Junior High (1979). I had no friends and painfully shy. I saw some kids looking through the rules for the D&D box set & was intrigued by the artwork. We started talking and I found they were looking for a new player. Well I was hooked. My first Character was a fighter Named Anton. I was amazed at how I got to explore the hero within myself. Over the years I have played every class & race I have always learned something new about myself and the friends around me.

In college I had to take a test. What would you take with you if you were stranded on the moon. There was a long list of items from oxegen to flairs. I was the first person to ever get all the (NASA/special forces approved) correct answers. WHen the  teacher asked HOw I got the answers right I answered, I play D&D!

D&D has taught me respect, courage & integrity. I have learned to think on my feet & to think outside the norm.

I had the honor to have sat next to Gary at the 2008 Hickman Bavarian Killer Breakfast (GenCon Indy) and thank him for all the years of joy his imagination brought me.

I have passed on my love of D&D to my daughter and when he is ready my son will also learn what a strong imagination and sense of adventure can do for ones life.

Thank you Gary for helping make me the man I am today.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

John Perschall ( This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

D&D was the first game that really made people think about how they wanted to act in a game. They had to make choices based on their alignment, and/or for the good of their group. The game play was always good for laughter, and edge of your seat fear of being not knowing what lied behind a door, or the next turn of the hallway. The game got people to discuss all kinds of topics about good and evil, life and death. Games could take much longer because of the discussions that went on. In my opinion that was a good thing. It made people talk about their
fears,hopes, and myriad other things.

When you started making dungeons you had to start thinking in three dimensions. Laying out your dungeon on graph paper. Making sure that stairways lined up with floors above, and below. Trap doors had to drop in to the correct room. So many things. This could be carried out to as many levels as you cared to make.

D&D was genius at it's purest. Gary Gygax came up with this idea then brought it to an attunement that was so pitch perfect that people are still joining the choir. D&D changed gaming forever. It had an influence on people's thinking about how games should be made. Evey RPG made since, and many games that aren't
RPG's owe their success to D&D.

I don't have the words to thank Gary Gygax for bringing a piece of his genius out in to the real world for all of us to play with, but i thank you Gary and wish you nothing but good rolls.

Tuesday, 07 June 2011

 

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